Science

Key Stage 3

Throughout key stage 3, students will develop literacy, numeracy and scientific knowledge through researching and answering ‘big questions’. These questions are designed to allow students and teachers to explore the topic in depth to allow a greater understanding and enjoyment of science before moving into key stage 4.

Year 7
Terms 1 and 2: Working scientifically
Biology – Cells
Chemistry – Particles & Elements
Physics – Forces

Terms 3 and 4: Biology – Body systems
Chemistry – Reactions
Physics – Space & Sound

Terms 5 and 6: Science project: This project is designed to consolidate learning from the year through a combination of practical and research tasks.
Biology – Reproduction
Physics – Light & acids and alkalis

Year 8
By the end of term two students in year 8 will have completed the following topics:
Terms 1 and 2: Working scientifically – A topic designed to develop practical science skills.
Biology – Health & Lifestyle
Chemistry – Periodic table and separation techniques
Physics – Sound and Light

Terms 3 and 4:
Biology – Adaptation and inheritance
Chemistry – Metals and acids
Physics – Motion and Pressure

Terms 5 and 6:
Biology – Ecosystem process
Chemistry – Earth
Physics – Forces

Year 9
Terms 1 and 2: Working scientifically – A topic designed to develop practical science skills.
Biology – Genetics & Body systems
Chemistry – Carbon cycle & Materials
Physics – Motion and pressure?

Terms 3 and 4:
Biology – New technology
Chemistry – New technology
Physics – New technology

Terms 5 and 6:
Biology – Problem Solving
Chemistry – Problem solving
Physics – Problem solving

GCSE preparation – This preparation is designed to consolidate learning from the Key Stage through a combination of practical and research tasks to ensure students have a secure understanding of fundamental key points to ensure a smooth progress in to KS4.

Key Stage 4

There are four possible Science routes at Key Stage 4:

GCSE Core Science.

GCSE Double Science (Core and Additional Science)

GCSE Triple Sciences using the AQA specifications for Biology, Chemistry and Physics

BTEC Science

During year 10 and 11 whilst completing GCSE courses, students need to ensure that they revise on a regular basis. The Science GCSE section on BBC Bitesize website will provide all students with the opportunity to reinforce all topics covered in lessons as well as the opportunity to complete mini assessments to check their understanding. Past papers and mark schemes can also be accessed from the AQA website.

Revision notes, activities and mini assessments for Science A (core Science), Additional Science, Biology, Chemistry and Physics GCSE Science can be found on BBC Bitesize. Students must always select the AQA option. These pages can be found by following the link here

During years 10 and 11 the students will be expected to have with them basic equipment, which they will use on a regular basis. This includes: a pen, a pencil, a rubber, a pencil sharpener, a calculator, a protractor and a compass. All students must follow the Science Health and Safety rules when working in a laboratory. This includes the wearing of safety goggles and tying back long hair as requested.

GCSE Core Science

What will my child learn in GCSE Core Science?

Students who take double award science will study for their Core Science A GCSE in year 10. This GCSE is made up of a Biology module, a Chemistry module and a Physics module.

The specification for this GCSE can be found by using the link here

How is GCSE Core Science taught?

Having 3 teachers means that students will have 3 different styles of teaching. Students will learn how Scientists carry out experiments and how data is handled in the real world, examples would include how scientists make sure that rock climbing rope is strong enough to hold a climbers weight.

Science staff use a variety of activities to explain concepts these might include experiments, ICT for research and simulations, discussion, debate, poster making, creative writing, videos and mind mapping.

How is GCSE Core Science assessed?

Throughout each module the students will complete regular assessments (GCSE style questions) which are used to track their progress and to ensure that appropriate interventions are put in place to maximise achievement.

Each of these modules are assessed by students sitting a 1 hour written exam paper in June with each module accounting for 25% of the GCSE grade. The final 25% is awarded following the completion of an Investigative skills assignment (ISA) which is an internally assessed controlled assessment

GCSE Double Science

Students who take double Science will complete two separate GCSEs in Science. These GCSEs are called Core Science and Additional Science. Core Science information is as above. Additional Science information is shown below

Students who take double award science will study for their Additional Science GCSE in year 11.

What will my child learn in GCSE Additional Science

This GCSE is made up of a Biology module, a Chemistry module and a Physics module.

The specification for this GCSE can be found by using the link here

How is GCSE Additional Science taught?

Having 3 teachers means that students will have 3 different styles of teaching. Students will learn how Scientists carry out experiments and how data is handled in the real world, examples would include how scientists make sure that rock climbing rope is strong enough to hold a climbers weight.

Science staff use a variety of activities to explain concepts these might include experiments, ICT for research and simulations, discussion, debate, poster making, creative writing, videos and mind mapping.

How is GCSE Additional Science assessed

Throughout each module the students will complete regular assessments (GCSE style questions) which are used to track their progress and to ensure that appropriate interventions are put in place to maximise achievement.

Each of these modules are assessed by students sitting a 1 hour written exam paper in May with each module accounting for 25% of the GCSE grade. The final 25% is awarded following the completion of an Investigative skills assignment (ISA) which is an internally assessed controlled assessment.
GCSE Triple Sciences using the AQA specifications for Biology, Chemistry and Physics

What will my child learn in Triple Science

Students who opt for triple Science will complete separate GCSEs in Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Each GCSE is comprised of a three modules and a controlled assessment

The specification for this GCSE can be found by using the below links:

Biology

Chemistry

Physics

How is Triple Science taught?

Having 3 teachers means that students will have 3 different styles of teaching. Students will learn how Scientists carry out experiments and how data is handled in the real world, examples would include how scientists make sure that rock climbing rope is strong enough to hold a climbers weight.

Science staff use a variety of activities to explain concepts these might include experiments, ICT for research and simulations, discussion, debate, poster making, creative writing, videos and mind mapping.

Throughout each module the students will complete regular assessments (GCSE style questions) which are used to track their progress and to ensure that appropriate interventions are put in place to maximise achievement

How is Triple Science Assessed?

Each GCSE is comprised of a three modules and a controlled assessment. Each of these modules are assessed by students sitting a 1 hour written exam paper in May/June with each module accounting for 25% of the GCSE grade. The final 25% is awarded following the completion of an Investigative skills assignment (ISA) which is an internally assessed controlled assessment.

Throughout each module the students will complete regular assessments (GCSE style questions) which are used to track their progress and to ensure that appropriate interventions are put in place to maximise achievement.

BTEC Principles of Applied Science

What will my child learn in BTEC Principles of Applied Science

Students following the BTEC course in Science will have the opportunity to gain a Level 2 qualification.

Students following this course must ensure they have excellent attendance and be prepared to manage their time effectively.

How is BTEC Principles of Applied Science Assessed?

This course is examined by a one hour examination of Unit 1 content and a portfolio of assessed work on Biology, Chemistry and Physics topics.

Key Stage 5

We are delighted that many of our students decide to continue to study science at A-Level and beyond.

Larkmead School is part of a Consortium of schools which offers all three science A-levels.

Chemistry and Biology AS and A2 courses are delivered at Larkmead.

Biology

Biology involves the study of a wide range of exciting topics, ranging from molecular biology to the study of ecosystems and from microorganisms to mammoths. Biology is never far from the headlines either.

The AS and A2 courses provide a range of knowledge and skills that can be applied to a variety of careers.

Topics studied include DNA structure, infectious and lifestyle diseases including cholera and cancer – all of which are very topical at the moment. The course also covers genetic engineering, the structure of chemicals such as proteins and carbohydrates. Teaching is mainly through lessons which include a variety of activities and practical sessions. ICT and the Internet are also used where appropriate. You will have the opportunity to attend study days and there may be some fieldwork.

The course is assessed by modular exams and by Controlled Assessment (one piece at AS, one at A2 Level). The controlled assessment takes the form of a practical activity followed by data analysis and a written test.

The Biology A Level course helps students develop a number of skills including:

How to collect data and evaluate it
How to investigate facts and use deduction
How to put over your point of view effectively
How to take responsibility for your own learning.
These skills will enable you to develop an understanding of the concepts, principles, relationships and wider application of biology in the world in which you live.

Chemistry

The syllabus is divided into modules, each of which is examined separately. Chemistry is the study of materials and the changes accompanying their interaction. The power of the chemist lies in exploiting the properties of materials. Equally, it is the responsibility of the chemist to ensure that we use materials safely and for the good of all.

AS/A Level Chemistry gives you a fundamental knowledge of these issues and builds on topics already covered in the GCSE. Social, economic, ethical, environmental, medical and technological aspects of chemistry are included in the course. Chemistry will provide a sound appreciation and basis for further or related study.

Chemistry is essentially a practical subject and students will spend a significant amount of time acquiring skills to enable them to carry out experiments and investigations to a high degree of accuracy and reliability.