Design & Technology

Key Stage 3

Key Stage 3 consists of students in years 7 to 9. In this time we aim to provide the students with the skills they will need for GCSE, completing smaller projects, learning the design process and gaining knowledge about the different specialist areas of Design Technology we teach.

In Key Stage 3 our students move through 3 different specialist areas each year, these consist of Resistant Materials, Food Technology and Graphic Products.

Each lasts for 13 weeks and in this time the students produce both, a product and written work to assist with their learning.

Year 7

Resistant Materials | Design and Make Tasks | Aluminium key ring, Plastic paperclip, Hand-held travel game
Graphic Products Design and Make Tasks | Pop-up cards/Comic Book
Mechanisms
Food Technology | Food hygiene & safety, Equipment, weighing and measuring, Nutrition & healthy eating, Ethical food production, Food – other cultures and religions, DMT – fruit salad, pizza toast, seasonal muffins, apple crumble, Apprentice project

Year 8

Resistant Materials | Design and Make Tasks | Chocolate moulds and package, Carriage clocks
Graphic Products | Design & Make Tasks | Point of sale & advertising (Red Letter Day Gift), Structure
Structures
Food Technology  | Nutrition & healthy eating, Fair trade, Sensory analysis, Cake & bread making, Ethical & environmentally friendly food production, DMT – fajitas, bread, chilli con carne, cakes, pastry jumble

Year 9

Resistant Materials | Design & Make Tasks | Laminated coasters/fridge magnets/pin badges, Bottle openers – ergonomic handle
Graphic Products | Design & Make Tasks | Graphic design of portable speakers for an I-Pod, Graphic design & advertising for new board game
Electronic Systems | input/control/output
Food Technology | Food hygiene & safety, Nutrition & healthy eating, Asian foods, Special diets, Pastry making, Packaging & labelling,Convenience foods & lifestyle choices, DMT – stir fry, curry, piped biscuits, fruit tarts, apple turnovers, Olympic project

Key Stage 4 - Catering

What will my child learn in Design and Technology – Catering?

Students will gain an understanding of food production techniques and how to design a menu suitable for a variety of consumers. They will cover a variety of practical pieces which will encourage creativity and will build confidence and skill level. Students will select a task from a choice of design brief for the Year 10 controlled task, and then develop a two course meal menu for the Year 11 controlled task. You will also cover theoretical aspects of the catering industry and learn about team management techniques, the job roles that are available and the diverse nature of the catering industry.

How is Design and Technology – Catering taught?

Students will cover a mixture of practical and theory throughout the course. This will provide them with the skills and knowledge to succeed in the practical exam, theoretical controlled assessment and the final written examination. The course involves working independently and as part of a team, to reflect the conditions of a professional kitchen. This is a practical course and students are expected to purchase ingredients for all practical sessions.

How is Design and Technology – Catering Assessed?

Controlled assessment – 20% of final G.C.S.E.. A catering related design brief in year 10.
Controlled assessment – 40% of final G.C.S.E.. A catering related design brief in year 11.
Written Examination: contributes 40% of the final G.C.S.E..

Key Stage 4 - Graphic Products

What will my child learn in Design and Technology – Graphic Products?

Students will be able to design and make products, with creativity and originality in a variety of practical activities, using a range of graphic and modelling materials and new technologies.

How is Design and Technology – Graphic Products taught?

Students will use technical drawing skills learnt in Years 7 to 9 to create a variety of design projects. Computers will be used to investigate and develop their design. Students will make products and use digital photography to show how their design develops.
It is anticipated that there will be one group of mixed ability pupils. D&T Graphics will be taught in single lessons.

How is Design and Technology – Graphic Products assessed?

Controlled Assessment – 60% of final GCSE (1/3 Practical & 2/3 Research & Design)
Written Examination – 40% of final GCSE

Key Stage 4 - Resistant Materials

What will my child learn in Resistant Materials?

Students will be able to design and make products, with creativity and originality in a variety of practical activities, using a range of materials and techniques. They will acquire a working knowledge of woods, metals, plastics and composite materials.

How is Design and Technology – Resistant Materials taught?

There will be a number of set design tasks that will allow students to experience the different materials and tools that can be used in this area. At the end of year ten a more open ended design task will be set allowing students to practice the skills they will need for year eleven and the practical GCSE project. It is anticipated that there will be one group of mixed ability pupils, with two double lessons and one single a fortnight. Students will experience wood, metal and plastics through a range of projects which will build on the techniques demonstrated by teaching staff.

How is Design and Technology – Resistant Materials assessed?

Controlled Assessment – 60% of final GCSE (1/3 Practical & 2/3 Research & Design)
Written Examination – 40% of final GCSE

Key Stage 4 - Systems & Control

What will my child learn in Design and Technology – Systems and Control?

Students will be able to design and make products, with creativity and originality in a variety of practical activities, using a range of control systems including electronic sensors, pneumatics and mechanisms. They will acquire a working knowledge of PCB manufacture and design layout as well as the function of electronic components and mechanisms.

How will Design and Technology – Systems and Control be taught?

There will be a number of set design tasks that will allow students to experience the different materials and electronic components that can be used in this area. At the end of year ten a more open ended design task will be set allowing students to practice the skills they will need for year eleven and their practical GCSE project. It is anticipated that there will be one group of mixed ability pupils. D&T systems and control will be taught in single lessons.

How is Design and Technology – Systems and Control assessed?

Controlled Assessment – 60% of final GCSE (1/3 Practical & 2/3 Research & Design)
Written Examination – 40% of final GCSE

Key Stage 5 - Systems & Control

What will my child learn in A-Level Systems and Control

The Systems and Control course has been designed to encourage students to take a broad view of design and technology. It also helps students to participate in and think about tomorrow’s rapidly changing technologies, and to intervene creatively to improve their quality.

The Systems and Control A-Level course follows a similar format to that of Design & Technology GCSEs. Students will be required to complete a series of modular components, including practical controlled assessment tasks and examination elements. However, unlike the GCSE course, the weighting of these modules is more evenly spread, with the examination components carrying the same percentage of the overall course as the practical controlled assessment tasks. Systems and Control can be studied as a one-year AS level or a two-year A2 level course.

The Systems and Control A-level can be combined with a number of other A-level options to meet entry requirements for university courses, apprenticeships, work placements and other further education opportunities. Some of the possible A-level combinations are listed below.

Systems and Control A-level with a combination of the following:
English
Mathematics
Physics
Chemistry
Music
Art
Geography
ICT

An AS level in Systems and Control will also carry a UCAS points score and demonstrate to possible future employers that you have the potential for creative, analytical, investigative and research skills.
An A-level in Systems and Control with a combination of the subjects listed above would be an ideal arrangement for a university course.

Possible Higher Education Courses include:
Engineering
Creative Product Design
Product Design and Innovation
3 D Design
Web Design
Media Design
Game Design
3 D Animation
Architecture